Our Studies

Scientific Validation

We believe that food supplements should be backed by robust science.

Over the last 10 years, 14 studies have been undertaken on our ingredient, ERME, all with consistent results.

Studies have shown that ERME™ supports:

The diversification of gut bacteria (which improves the capability and resilience of the gut)


An increase in valuable bacteria, particularly those that produce Butyrate (important for cells of the gut wall) and those that have an anti-inflammatory response


A significant decrease in toxins in the gut



The research that has led to ERME™ was the first to establish the role that bacteria and fermentation plays in gut health. Published in the Lancet back in 1982 by Professor Hunter, the research led to an understanding that when the small intestine doesn’t digest food completely, especially carbohydrates, it can cause mal-fermentation in the large intestine. In turn, this can lead to the growth of unhealthy flora. This imbalance can irritate the gut.


Professor Hunter’s work also showed that when certain carbohydrates are restricted in the diet, IBS symptoms and mal-fermentation are reduced².

Key Studies


Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Study of the effect of (ERME™) on hydrogen

excretion. J O Hunter 2017

Description

Following studies in racehorses, an initial IBS pilot study in humans was completed in the UK and generated positive results.

The effect of ERME™ was studied in a double-blind pilot study in which ERME™ was compared with a placebo.

Hypothesis

ERME™ increases digestion in the small bowel – decreases hydrogen released from the mal-fermentation of carbohydrates and starch reaching the lower bowel.

Results

Shown in human volunteers to improve digestion

in the small bowel.

  • Respiratory hydrogen concentrations (a marker for mal-fermentation) were determined for six hours after eating wholemeal bread and butter.
  • IBS symptoms were prevented in all IBS patients studied.
  • ERME™ was shown to significantly reduce hydrogen breath levels between 270 and 360 minutes after eating.
  • Volunteer feedback also positively demonstrated that ERME™ increases stool softness and improves passage.

An enzyme-rich malt extract (ERME™) for the treatment of chronic constipation, A Hobson et al: – BMJ GUT 2023

Description

Twenty patients with chronic constipation were recruited for an open-label pilot study to investigate the impact of ERME™ on constipation symptoms.

Hypothesis

The first line of treatment for constipation is centred on fibre, including increasing dietary fibre and/or fibre supplements. However, fermentable fibres can exacerbate other gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, such as abdominal pain and bloating. Enzyme-rich malt extract (ERME) reduces GI fermentation levels and improves symptoms of constipation.

Results

Improves constipation symptoms in patients with severe constipation

  • After 4-weeks of ERME, the overall constipation (KESS) score was significantly reduced, and stool consistency significantly improved.
  • The number of weekly bowel movements (WBM) in patients (10/15) with ≤1 daily bowel movement showed a significant increase
  • Daily mean symptom scores significantly reduced from Week 0 to Week 4 for abdominal pain and bloating
  • No adverse events were reported.

Clinical study investigating IBS symptoms and changes to biomarkers and metagenomics, ECU Perth 2022

Description

A randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded cross-over study examining a number of IBS symptoms, lifestyle factors and gut health (i.e. microbiota, gut permeability, and metabolic profile) in individuals with IBS.

Results

Awaiting publication

IBS Study, NHS Swansea University, UK 2023

Description

A study of 20-30 newly diagnosed IBS patients focussing on mal-fermenters. IBS symptoms, quality of life, metagenomics, and biomarkers will be measured pre and post-4 weeks of ERME. This study has ethics approval, and recruitment has commenced.

Results

Study in progress

IBS observational study, Epworth Hospital Research Centre, Dr Harry Frydenberg,

Melbourne, VIC 2023

Description

An observational study of 100 patients measuring IBS symptoms in malfermenters pre and post-ERME over an 8-week period. This study is being prepared for ethics approval.

Results

Study in progress

Athletic Performance


Pilot study investigating Athletic Performance in semi-professional cyclists, University of Birmingham 2017

Description

Ateria completed a randomised, controlled, double-blind pilot study on serious cyclists in Birmingham, UK.

Hypothesis

ERME™ improves performance by increasing energy available and reducing breakdown of body tissue, but also relieves the pathology produced by malabsorption of starch.

Results

Demonstrated improvements in performance in a randomised, double-blind study.

  • Results showed the control group had a 3.08% improvement in performance, and the ERME™ experiment group had a 4.77% improvement, with some individuals delivering a 10-15% improvement in performance.
  • ERME™ was shown to increase the energy available from the gut and thus indicating reduced tissue damage during exercise, helping to maintain condition.

Clinical study investigating changes to biomarkers and metagenomics in health Althetes, ECU Perth 2022

Description

A randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded cross-over study examining the influence of four weeks of supplementation of ERME™ on gut health (i.e. microbiota, gut permeability, and metabolic profile) in highly trained endurance runners.

Results

Awaiting publication

Asthma & Alergy


Effects of ERME in a model of house-dust-mite induced allergic airways disease, TKI Perth 2022.

Description

A cross-over study design investigating the ability of ERME™ and a placebo to modulate an immune and lung response in the world-renowned Telethon Kids Institute asthma model.

Results

Awaiting publication

Study References


1 Alun Jones V, Shorthouse M,

McLaughlan P, Workman E, Hunter JO..  Food Intolerance: A

major factor in the  pathogenesis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Lancet ii:

1115-1117  198

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/6128447/

2 King TS, Elia M, Hunter

JO.  Abnormal colonic fermentation in irritable bowel

syndrome.  Lancet, 352 1187-1189. 1998 

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/9777836/

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